Does your child have ADHD?

Ryan Wexelblatt Adhd Therapy || Ride the Wave

Ride the Wave Counseling  works with boys and girls who present with ADHD and learning differences.

Does this describe your child’s challenges?

Social Skills

  • May be able to initially make friends but has trouble keeping them
  • Trouble understanding social cues 
  • Can initially make friends but then becomes “smothering”
  • Appears awkward and has difficulty initiating conversations with similar-age peers
  • Feels more comfortable communicating with younger children or adults than similar-age peers
  • Spends most free time alone, playing video games or watching videos of people playing video games
  • Tends to have one-sided conversations, talks at people about his/her interests
  • Frequently interrupts others or says things impulsively, lacks a “filter”
  • Can be inflexible, often says “No” to anything new
  • Says “friends” are people he/she speaks to online
  • Labels other kids with ADHD as “annoying” or “weird” despite the fact he acts like them
  • Lacks understanding how he/she is perceived by others
  • Has difficulty understanding other’s thoughts and feelings
  • Tries to be part of a peer group who is not accepting of him/her
  • Has a tendency to “police” other kids and tries to control them
  • Acts like the “class clown” in order to gain attention from peers
  • Had friends in elementary school but became more socially isolated when he got to middle school
  • Struggles in unstructured or semi-structured social situations

Executive Function Skills

  • Has a hard time sensing the passage of time
  • Difficulty tolerating boredom and non-preferred tasks
  • Needs constant prompting and supervision to get through any type of non-preferred tasks.
  • Believes homework will take much longer than it actually will
  • Struggles during unstructured times
  • Can be impulsive, does things without thinking about outcome or consequences
  • Chronically disorganized, forgets or looses materials
  • Under or over-estimates how long it will take to complete assignments
  • Has a hard time recalling how he performed a task in the past
  • Difficulty with future planning
  • Has a hard time self-monitoring himself and his schedule
  • Becomes easily distracted and/or wastes time with trivial matters
  • Focuses on small details and has a hard time getting the “bigger picture”
  • Has a messy school backpack or carries around too much
  • Completes homework but forgets to turn it in
  • Struggles with reading comprehension (remembers details but has a hard time summarizing)
  • Has a hard time with writing

Emotional Regulation Skills

  • Appears to be several years behind in his/her social and emotional maturity compared to same-age peers
  • Difficulty differentiating between “small problems” and “big problems”
  • Perseverates on the negative and has trouble letting go of things that bother him/her
  • Has difficulty when there are changes in routine or during transitions
  • Becomes argumentative or explosive when told to get off video games/computer
  • Has a hard time solving problems, wants you to solve problems for him/her
  • Tries to avoid non-preferred tasks
  • Lashes out at family when upset/angry and then is remorseful
  • Makes self-defeating comments
  • Does not understand how his tone of voice sounds to others
  • Has difficulty with competition
  • Low frustration tolerance
  • Holds it together during school and becomes irritable or more difficult to deal with after school

Your child needs to learn learn practical skills and strategies in a manner designed for how he learns best.   Traditional therapy/counseling is not designed for individuals with ADHD or related challenges.

Areas we frequently work on during our sessions/groups include:

  • Developing age-expected emotional regulation skills
  • Improving compliance at home
  • Developing resiliency to get through non-preferred tasks
  • Understanding how to be relatable to your similar-age peers
  • Improving cognitive flexibility (being less “black and white” in thought process)
  • Learning how to differentiate between what’s a “small problem” or “big problem”
  • Reducing compulsive video gaming/internet usage
  • Managing morning routine, homework, etc. more independently
  • Developing independent problem solving skills
  • Improving perspective taking ability (understanding other’s thoughts/feelings & understanding how you come across to others)
  • Improving self-confidence
  • Cultivating and sustaining friendships

Topics frequently addressed with parents include:

  • Improving compliance and avoiding power struggles
  • Transitioning off of screen time
  • Helping your child develop resiliency to complete non-preferred tasks
  • Improving executive function skills (going from being prompt-dependent to independent)
  • Setting realistic expectations at home
  • Helping your child shift from a sense of entitlement towards a motivation to earn things
  • Understanding how to move your child away from being over-dependent to feeling empowered
  • Managing your child’s emotional/behavioral dysregulation at home so family life is not revolving around your child’s moods and behaviors
  • Communicating with your child about difficult/uncomfortable topics

Please contact us to discuss how we can help your family.